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The line of trees crossing the Parkway immediately to your left, marked a section of the boundary accepted by the Choctaw Indians and the American Commission under Andrew Jackson in the treaty of Doaks Stand, October 20, 1820. You are on the Choctaw side of the boundary. The Choctaw reluctantly gave to the United States the land west of the line from White Oak Spring on the old Indian Path, northwardly to a black oak standing on the Natchez Road, about 40 poles eastwardly from Doaks fence marked "AJ" and blazed. The area surrendered by the Choctaw Nation amounted to some 5.5 million acres, about 1/3 of their land. Ten years later in 1830, the Choctaws were forced to give up all their lands. Other Indians were forced to do the same by 1834 thus clearing for white settlement all areas of the three states crossed by the Natchez Trace.

Doaks Stand - About 1812 William Doak established his stand, or tavern, on the Natchez Trace which is five miles north of the Parkway at this point. The Treaty of Doaks Stand was signed there in 1820 because, "He conducted himself respectfully toward those who called at his house and made considerable improvement on the land." Doak was given sole right to purchase his land after it was opened for settlement. When the Robinson Road took traffic from the Natchez Trace, the stand was moved to the crossing of the Choctaw Boundary and the new road about 1/2 mile north of here.


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